Richard Commey’s glory-hunt: 30 days to go!

January 3, 2019

THE PRICE IS PROPORTIONATE TO THE PRIZE, THE IMPERATIVE, THE FORCE FOR THE ATTAINMENT OF THE PURPOSE, THE FULFILMENT OF DESTINY.

That is the case of Richard Commey, the Ghanaian slugger robbed of justice by ring officials, other pugilists and the International Boxing Federation, the past three years.

The operating word, there, is “the past”. Though the past is right there, it’s an instructive guide to Team Commey to ensure their preparation and determination exceeds the opportunity before them.

Commey is scheduled to stake his claim to the throne of IBF lightweights on Feb 2, at the Ford Center, at The Star, the training facility of the Dallas Cowboys, in Frisco, Texas.

That day, his opponent, Isa Chaniez, will learn the difference between fighting solely in Russia and stepping out of his comfort zone to fight at the venue of Stars, in the USA.

Though the Russian is the official opponent, there have been other forms of opposition to Commey’s world title quest.

That quest has experienced several twists and turns, since his very first shot at the IBF lightweight crown when he contested Robert Easter, Jr., on Sept. 9, 2016.

Thanks to the venue and the partisan crowd, ekowasmahsports.com contends the judges favoured the ‘home’ fighter, and Easter was awarded the belt, thanks to a split decision.

That disappointment pursued Commey to Russia where homeboy, Denis Shafikov, was adjudged to have prevailed, on a split decision, in the final eliminator to Easter’s crown, in a clear case of travesty, on Dec. 2, 2016.

If that was disappointing to Team Commey, it did not reflect in his next fight he took at  Bukom, Accra, the origin of most Ghanaian world champions, gaining an unanimous decision over a game Hedi Slimani on March 11, 2017.

Incidentally, that happened to be Commey’s last association with former trainer, Carl Lokko, who’d been accused of being the weak link in the two Commey losses, by Paul Dogboe, the trainer who spectacularly presided over an apocalyptic-style demolition of his son, Isaac Dogboe, on Dec. 8, last year by Mexican Emmanuel Navarette, the current WBO bantam king.

In Lokko’s place, stepped Andre Rozier, a former amateur boxer who is channeling his short-circuited potential pro greatness into his wards, one of which, Daniel Jacobs, ascended the world middleweight monarchy.

Thanks to the same tutelage, two hapless victims have endured knockouts by Commey, who has unveiled a discernibly more aggressive style.

If that new viciousness frightened Easter, one couldn’t tell, but it couldn’t be far from the truth.

For, Easter took flight from that fight, and took on WBC lightweight titlist, Mikey Garcia, on an apology of a fight that exposed the vast limitations of Easter.

The IBF had signed off on the travesty of bypassing Commey, inspite of the sanctioning body’s previous order to Easter for a mandatory against the Ghanaian slugger.

In an attempt to save face, though, the IBF had granted the Garcia-Easter unification on condition of the winner staking the IBF crown against Commey, right away.

Still, more frustration ambushed Team Commey.

Garcia gave Easter a beatdown, last July, allright but right away sought to breach the conditions of that unification!

Instead of fulfilling the date with the hard-punching Commey, he declared his readiness to scale two weight divisions to fight IBF welterweight king Errol Spence, Jr.

Garcia then shrunk from that challenge, committed to fighting Commey, hammered out a deal, then chickened out, again, only to vacate the title, then commit to the Spence fight, scheduled for March, this year.

That gamesmanship left many wondering if Garcia’s ‘pursuit’ of a clash with Errol Spence Jr., for the stated claim of greatness, was not, indeed, a flight from a fight with Commey.

Similarly, Easter had ducked Commey in the mandatory.

That it would greatly embarrass him in the manner he was roundly bounced across the ring in an ignominious one-sided beatdown, consigning him to possible oblivion, seemed a better price to pay than fight Commey.

Wow! Is Commey that dangerous? Is Commey that good? Well, what does his credentials say? 27-2 (24 KO). There it is! The numbers never lie.

Could that (probable fright), perhaps, be the reason Garcia – taking a leaf from Easter, Jr – seems to be taking flight from a fight with Commey?

Is that question even legit? Well, let’s examine the narrative.

 

END OF PART ONE.


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