Runners collapse in hottest EVER London Marathon

April 22, 2018

Helpers rush to the aid of a man who collapsed near the finish of the marathon, where the baking temperatures made it one of the hardest runs in the event's history

Dozens of shattered runners had to be stretchered away from the finish line after completing the hottest ever London marathon today.

Many exhausted competitors collapsed to the ground after running the 26.2 mile course in the sweltering heat, while others stood in front of fans as they desperately tried to cool down.

Mobile water stations had to be dispatched to provide runners with water after stations between miles eight and ten ran out.

Race organisers had previously urged runners to reconsider aiming for personal bests and suggested ditching fancy dress costumes amid the unseasonably warm April weather.

A runner is strapped into a stretcher near the finish line by paramedics on a busy day for the emergency services this afternoon

A runner is helped by paramedics and event staff following a heroic effort to reach the finish line in London on one of the hottest days of the year so far

It was the hottest London Marathon on record with the temperature reaching 23 degrees Celsius – although it was estimated to be even hotter on the tarmac.

Sir Mo Farah broke the British marathon record today but lost his cool after complaining that race stewards were too busy taking pictures of him, they forgot to hand him water.

Farah was irritated at not being able to find the right water bottle at two drink stations early in the race.

At one point he was even seen remonstrating with the motorcyclists travelling alongside the runners.

‘The drink station was confusing,’ he added. ‘The staff were helpful at the end but at the beginning they were trying to take a picture rather than giving me the drink.

‘I was saying to the people on motorbikes to tell the staff to be a bit helpful. I wasn’t wasting energy, I just needed a drink. I had to get it right.’

St John Ambulance personnel  carried fatigued competitors who were unable to make it to the finish line and required medical attention 

An athlete was forced to seek medical help close to the finish line at the Mall after collapsing to the floor during the run-in

Two officials give a helping hand to another man who also needed assistance soon after crossing the finish line in London

Exhausted runners cross the finish line in front of large crowds near Buckingham Palace, where race officials were on hand to assist

Exhausted runners cross the finish line in front of large crowds near Buckingham Palace, where race officials were on hand to assist

Meanwhile, Paula Radcliffe’s world record survived as Vivian Cheruiyot timed her run to perfection to win the women’s race.

Cheruiyot, 34, took advantage of failed attempts by last year’s winner Mary Keitany and runner-up Tirunesh Dibaba to break Radcliffe’s 15-year-old mark.

Once again the conditions told as first Dibaba, of Ethiopia, and then Cheruiyot’s fellow Kenyan Keitany fell away allowing the 2016 Olympic 5,000 metres gold medallist to claim victory.

Lily Partridge was the first British woman over the line in eighth place.

Large fans are set up at the end of the race to cool down runners who managed to complete the run on what has been officially declared the hottest London Marathon on record

A runner on a stretcher is helped by medical staff during the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon earlier this afternoon

A grimacing athlete cools off during a baking afternoon in London today, where thousands of runners are taking part in the annual marathon

A woman is helped over the finish line by two fellow competitors after battling the sweltering conditions during today's race

An exhausted runner cools herself off in front of a fan after completing the marathon on a sweltering day in London

A runner is helped across the finishing line by fellow competitors after struggling in the searing conditions 

A runner receives medical assistance after completing the hottest ever London marathon today

Paramedics assist shattered runners at the end of the 26.2 race that was the hottest ever London marathon

Paramedics assist shattered runners at the end of the 26.2 race that was the hottest ever London marathon
Paramedics assist shattered runners at the end of the 26.2 race that was the hottest ever London marathon

Britain’s David Weir won the men’s wheelchair race for the eighth time after a thrilling sprint finish.

The 38-year-old pipped Switzerland’s Marcel Hug into second place, with Daniel Romanchuk of the USA third.

The British Paralympic star, nicknamed the Weirwolf, said it was ‘even better’ than his victory last year, which he had described as perhaps the best race of his career. Australia’s Madison de Rozario won the women’s wheelchair race.

The first fire crew to arrive at the Grenfell Tower inferno ran the race, raising more than £41,000 for children affected by the disaster.

The team of nine from red watch at North Kensington took on the race, with David Badillo saying it was ‘very emotional’ for them.

‘It was a really positive thing to do after all that we’ve been through together’, the firefighter of 18 years in the neighbourhood said.

The group ran to raise money for children who survived the fire which broke out on June 14 last year 

Firemen who attended the inferno that night completed the marathon with some wearing their full gear

The money will go to Kids On The Green, a volunteer organisation set up in the aftermath of the blaze to support traumatised children.

It offers free counselling to survivors and witnesses, as well as activities such as art therapy and entertainment, including discos.

Mr Badillo, 44, said: ‘We go down there, we’ve helped them build walls, plastering, we’re a very close-knit community.

‘My boxing club was at the bottom of the tower and I also knew some people in the tower so it was very personal.

‘The emotion came seeing all our community lining the route, especially seeing Kids On The Green and all the green hearts and all the messages of support and their banners.’

The race was started by the Queen when she pressed a ‘red buzzer’ from the grounds of Windsor Castle, as 40,000 runners pounded the streets of the capital in sticky conditions. 

Mo Farah poses with Prince Harry shortly after finishing third in today's men's race, where there was controversy after the runner was unable to find his water bottle at a fuelling station

The Queen sounded the buzzer from Windsor Castle for the beginning of the London marathon 

The Queen chats to Sir John Spurling, ahead of the London Marathon, which saw 40,000 runners on the 26.2 miles to The Mall

The race started when the Queen pushed the button in front of the Round Tower in the grounds of Windsor Castle

The Queen smiles as she arrives for the start the London Marathon from Windsor Castle this morning 

David Weir (left) won the men's wheelchair marathon during a fantastic finish on the Mall 

Runners struggle with the heat as 40,000 runners pound the streets of the capital in sweltering conditions

Sir Mo Farah makes his way past the video screen of Queen Elizabeth II during the start of the marathon 

Sir Mo, who has now retired from track running, gestures for water during the men's elite race this morning 

Sir Mo asks for water as he struggles in the heat during the 38th edition of the world famous event 

In light of the warm weather, participants were advised to drop their goal-times and organisers added more ice, water and run-through shower stations along the 26.2-mile course.

Among this year’s runners were firefighters who tackled the Grenfell Tower blaze, a police officer stabbed in the London Bridge terror attack and members of the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust.

The 18-year-old – who was a keen runner – was stabbed by thugs at a bus stop in Eltham, South East London, 25 years ago today.

Journalist Bryony Gordon and plus-size model Jada Sezer completed the 26.2 mile course in nothing but bras, knickers, socks and trainers.

The brave pair were running to raise money for Heads Together, the mental health charity set up by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, as well as hoping to encourage other curvy women to embrace exercise.

Fans also speculated that Katie Price had dropped out after she disappeared from the race’s tracker less than 15 kilometres into the race.

Katie Price was running to raise money for the British Lung Foundation after her mother Amy was diagnosed with a terminal lung condition

A policeman was seen wearing Price's costume less than hour after she disappeared from the race tracker app 

She had taken on the gruelling test dressed as giant pair of inflatable lungs in aid of the British Lung Foundation after her mother was diagnosed with a terminal lung illness.

The former glamour model, 39, failed to train due to a knee injury and followers have questioned whether she dropped out after a police officer was picture sporting her costume.

In an interview with Heat magazine she said previously: ‘I haven’t gone the distance I did before, because my knees are damaged…but I’d rather save my strength for marathon day.’

This is not the first time the Loose Women star has attempted the marathon.

In 2009 she was helped over the finish line by then-husband Peter Andre after injuring her knee.

Two fun runners pound the streets on a scorching day in London for the 40,000 competitors today

Two fun runners pound the streets on a scorching day in London for the 40,000 competitors today

A fun runner smiles to the crowd the London marathon gets underway on a hot day in the capital

Kathrine Switzer, 71, the woman who defied men-only rules to run the Boston marathon more than 50 years ago finished the race in under five hours.

She made global headlines after a race official infamously tried and failed to stop her running the then all-male Boston marathon in 1967.

Speaking today she said of the race: ‘Of the 181,000 first-timers who applied, most of them were women.

‘That tells me women are now taking a risk, taking a challenge, and going out there and laying it on the line. That’s really healthy and wonderful.’

A race official infamously tried and failed to stop Kathrine Switzer from running the then all-male Boston marathon in 1967. She ran today aged 71

Among this year's runners are members of the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust, including his mother Doreen (centre)

Ms Switzer, who won the New York City marathon in 1974, organised one of the first all-female marathons – in London in 1980.

She added: ‘London has played such a role in women’s sport equality because that race went on to get the women’s marathon into the Olympic Games and that changed everything for women’s running.’

Asked if the famous moment felt like half a century ago, the German-born runner said: ‘Sometimes it does and sometimes it doesn’t…

‘I feel like I’m 25, I feel no different when I’m running than I did then, I’m just slower.’

Ms Switzer, who kissed husband Roger Robinson after finishing, wore the number 261, just as she did in Boston all those years ago.

Runners arrive for the start of the race which is expected to be the hottest ever London marathon

Competitors from the Great British Bake Off smile for the cameras before the start of the annual event 

Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya (right) who won the race in 2015 and 2016, made a hat-trick of victories today 

Competitors started in Blackheath, south east London, running a snaking route along both sides of the Thames, finishing on The Mall near Buckingham Palace.

Last year, the event raised £61.5 million for charity, a world record for an annual one-day fundraising event, making the total raised since 1981 around £890 million, organisers said.

Among this year's runners are the heroic firefighters who tackled the Grenfell Tower blaze in June 

Runners face uncomfortable conditions, but the sunshine and warm weather has brought biggest crowds

A record 386,050 people applied for this year’s race – almost a third more than last year and the highest number for any marathon in the world.

Temperatures today beat the race’s previous 1996 record of 22.7C.

The previous warmest races in the capital were in 1996 and 2007, when highs of 22.2C were recorded. 

Going the extra mile: A runner dressed as Jesus carries an extra burden as he attempts to finish the London Marathon

In light of the warm weather, participants were advised to drop their goal-times and organisers have added more ice, water and run-through shower stations along the 26.2-mile course

SOURCE: dailymail.co.uk


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